Ramazzini; Blog on work and health by Annet Lenderink

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Sickness absence due to common mental illness in the Netherlands

This study investigated the incidence of sickness absence due to common mental disorders in the Netherlands from 2001 to 2007 in an observational study in about 1 million employees, working in various economic sectors, representative for the Dutch workforce.

The 12-month incidence of sickness absence due to common mental disorders was 2.2% in 2001, increased to 2.7% in 2004 and decreased thereafter to 2.0% in 2007.

The percentage of sick days due to common mental disorders was highest in the education sector (39%) followed by financial services (31%) and health care (30%).

In the Netherlands, the incidence of sickness absence with common mental disorders was highest in 2004 and has decreased since then probably because of changes in sick leave compensation, economic market position and company policies

Trends in the incidence of sickness absence due to common mental disorders between 2001 and 2007 in the Netherlands
Corné A. M. Roelen, P. C. Koopmans, R. Hoedeman, U. Bültmann, J. W. Groothoff and J. J. L. van der Klink
The European Journal of Public Health 2009 19(6):625-630

. Read the rest of this entry »

Filed under: Psychosocial disorders, Sickness absence, , ,

CTS: surgery and return to work

CTS_surgeryWork-related carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS) is a leading cause of lengthy disability.  To characterize associations between utilization of CTS surgery and duration of lost work 8224 workers’ compensation claims filed during 1990-1994 were studied. The findings suggest disability can be minimized by establishing the CTS diagnosis as early as possible and, if surgery is appropriate, conducting surgery without substantial delay and maximizing post-operative efforts to facilitate return to work.

Work-related carpal tunnel syndrome in Washington State workers’ compensation: Utilization of surgery and the duration of lost work
William E. Daniell, MD, MPH, Deborah Fulton-Kehoe, MPH, PhD , Gary M. Franklin, MD, MPH Am. J. Ind. Med. 2009

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Filed under: Compensation, Musculoskeletal problems, Physical load, Sickness absence, , ,

Delayed return to work in carpenters with back pain

From a case-control analysis of union carpenters in Washington Stae it turned out that delayed return t0 work (DRTW) after back injury was associated with
– being female (2.7, 95% CI: 1.3-5.5),
– age 30-44 (1.2, 95% CI: 0.9-1.7), 
– age over 45 (1.6, 95% CI: 1.1-2.3),
– four or more years union experience (1.4, 95% CI: 1.1-1.8),
– previous paid time loss back claim (1.8, 95% CI: 1.3-2.5),
– more than 30-day delay to medical care (3.6, 95% CI: 2.1, 6.1).
Evidence of more acute trauma was also associated with DRTW.

Predictors of delayed return to work after back injury: A case-control analysis of union carpenters in Washington State

Kristen L. Kucera, PhD, ATC, Hester J. Lipscomb, PhD , Barbara Silverstein, PhD, MPH 2, Wilfred Cameron, MS, CIH

American Journal of Industrial Medicine, Early View (Articles online in advance of print) Published Online: 3 Sep 2009 Read the rest of this entry »

Filed under: Compensation, Physical agents, Sickness absence

Work Health Promotion can work

burn_out_cm300Work Health Promotion, Job Well-Being, and Sickness Absences-A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis

Kuoppala, Jaana MD, PhD; Lamminpää, Anne MD, PhD; Husman, Päivi MSocSc

A systematic review by Finnish researchers shows that work health promotion is valuable on employees’ well-being and work ability and productive in terms of less sickness absences. Activities involving exercise, lifestyle, and ergonomics are potentially effective. On the other hand, education and psychological means applied alone do not seem effective. Work health promotion should target both physical and psychosocial environments at work.Work Health Promotion, Job Well-Being, and Sickness Absences-A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis

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Filed under: Job well being, Sickness absence, , ,

Simple and effective reducing absenteeism

A study carried out in day care centres in ten counties in southern and central Sweden showed that using hand disinfection with ethyl alcohol reduced absenteeism among children due to illness by 12%.

Initially, the study included nearly 3,000 children at 60 day care centres during a 30-week period from 2004 to 2005. A complete evaluation was available for 1,431 children in 29 day care centres. Neighbouring day care centres were paired up, with one of the centres using hand disinfection after hand washing (intervention group), while the other centre using soap and water only (control group).

Absenteeism due to illness was measured by means of the centres’ attendance lists and compared between the intervention and control groups.

In the intervention group, staff and children used hand disinfection gel containing 70% ethyl alcohol following each hand wash with soap, on average between two and six times per day, after bathroom use, before eating, and when dirty.

Use of hand disinfection reduces absenteeism from day care centres

So wash and disinfect your hands please 🙂

Filed under: Sickness absence,

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Annet Lenderink

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